Search Results for: voting rights

As early voting winds down across the country, voters are more determined to cast ballots than ever

This little PSA, coming in at exactly 60 seconds, reminds us of why each of our votes is needed. Brian wants you to know that it’s safe to vote in his Florida precinct. In Clay, New York—a suburb of Syracuse—so many people have early voted, they were already out of the beloved “I Voted” stickers at 10:30am on Saturday. Here’s hoping they get re-stocked soon. We really do, as a country, love those stickers.  Our love of our “I Voted” stickers really is a demonstration of how cool voting is. I voted early on Tuesday and tweeted about it. Yet I didn’t peel the backing off my sticker. I’m “saving” it for Tuesday.  Look’s like Maria’s dad isn’t ready to wear his sticker, either. I wonder if we have the same…
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Voting in a Covid Pandemic: Wear a Mask and Bring Your Own Pens

Early voting has already generated long, long lines in many states, and with the November election just 11 days away, many states and cities have imposed safety measures to protect voters and poll workers from exposure to the coronavirus.But polling places still have the potential to become “mass gathering events,” the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned in an advisory released on Friday, adding that measures to prevent the spread of Covid-19 could be improved.The C.D.C. based its latest advice on a survey from the experiences of 522 poll workers in Delaware’s statewide primary in September.Guidelines issued by the agency in June recommended various ways to minimize crowds at polling locations, including absentee voting and extended voting hours.To cut down on disease transmission, the C.D.C. also recommended putting up…
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Federal Appeals Courts Emerge as Crucial for Trump in Voting Cases

This month, a federal judge struck down a decree from Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas limiting each county in the state to a single drop box to handle the surge in absentee ballots this election season, rejecting Mr. Abbott’s argument that the limit was necessary to combat fraud.Days later, an appellate panel of three judges appointed by President Trump froze the lower court order, keeping Mr. Abbott’s new policy in place — meaning Harris County, with more than two million voters, and Wheeler County, with well under 4,000, would both be allowed only one drop box for voters who want to hand-deliver their absentee ballots and avoid reliance on the Postal Service.The Texas case is one of at least eight major election disputes around the country in which Federal District…
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Advocates want Georgia election officials to ease barriers to voting

The decision comes after the New Georgia Project sued Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger in his official capacity along with several other election officials. In 2018, U.S. District Court Judge Louis Sands determined Dougherty County, in southwest Georgia, had to accept late arriving ballots. Hurricane Matthew hit Dougherty County hard, causing disruptions to mail service. Ballots were delayed in being mailed to voters as well as mail being rerouted through Tallahassee. A spokesperson for the secretary of state told Atlanta’s CBS News that allowing the extended time would be a problem for election officials. Deputy Secretary of State Jordan Fuchs informed CBS News they were appealing the decision immediately.  Ufot called the appeal a waste of money. “Why in the middle of a pandemic would they not want to lean…
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Newt Gingrich Lies About Mail-In Voting, Claims Democrats Are Trying to “Steal” November Election

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich repeated President Donald Trump’s own false claims about mail-in voting, saying that Democrats can’t win an “honest election” so they are trying “to set up an ability to steal it.” Gingrich pointed to the state of Nevada, which the president announced his administration will sue after its legislature approved a measure to provide absentee ballots to all registered voters. “They’re going to mail ballots to 200,000 people, who according to the post office don’t exist. They’re either dead, they’ve moved, the address doesn’t work, 200,000 extra ballots floating around out there,” Gingrich said. He also mentioned the state of New York, saying that it took too long to get the results of congressional primaries because of a delay in counting absentee ballots. “You have two congressional districts that six…
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Mail Delays Fuel Concern Trump Is Undercutting Postal System Ahead of Voting

In the suburban Virginia district of Representative Gerald E. Connolly, a Democrat who leads the House subcommittee that oversees the Postal Service, 1,300 people voted by mail in a 2019 primary — last month, more than 34,000 did.“We are worried about new management at the Postal Service that is carrying out Trump’s avowed opposition to voting by mail,” Mr. Connolly said. “I don’t think that’s speculation. I think we are witnessing that in front of our own eyes.”Erratic service could delay the delivery of blank ballots to people who request them. And in 34 states, completed ballots that are not received by Election Day — this year it is Nov. 3 — are invalidated, raising the prospect that some voters could be disenfranchised if the mail system buckles.In other states,…
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Voting by Mail Is Popular. So Is the False Idea That It’s Ripe for Fraud.

Top Republicans were quick to dismiss the suggestion of putting off Election Day — but Democrats went further, calling it evidence that the president would stop at nothing to throw doubt on the validity of an election that he currently appears likely to lose.At this moment of coronavirus-driven insecurity, where do Americans stand on voting by mail? And how many might be persuaded, as the president argues, that the election’s very legitimacy is in doubt?Recent polling shows that Americans now overwhelmingly support universal access to mail-in voting. In national surveys from the past few months, all taken after Mr. Trump began attacking the idea as dangerous, upward of six in 10 respondents have said that they would favor making absentee voting universally available.But surveys also reflect how susceptible many people’s…
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Joyce Ladner Used Her Stories to Raise Awareness of the Civil Rights Movement. Now, She’s Telling Them in a New Way

Wfowl The March, TIME’s virtual actuality recent version of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, opens to the overall public on Friday at Chicago’s DuSable Museum of African American Historical previous, guests shall be in a arrangement to journey being portion of the crew on the day in 1963 when Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Delight in a Dream” speech. For Joyce Ladner, summoning that feeling requires no VR headset. Ladner became as soon as a teenage college student when, on Aug. 28, 1963, she ended up loyal on the again of King for the duration of that neatly-known speech. And her recollections of that day — as properly as what came ahead of and after — shall be portion of the model on the…
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Montgomery, Ala., Was a Hub of the Slave Trade and a Center of the Civil Rights Movement. It’s About to Swear in Its First Black Mayor

Hanging on the wall in Steven L. Reed’s old office as Montgomery County’s probate judge was a photo of his father, Joseph L. Reed, sitting next to civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. at Maggie Street Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala., in 1967. The two men are not merely sitting together by accident. They met in 1960, around the time the elder Reed was at Alabama State University and was put on probation for participating in a Feb. 25, 1960, sit-in at the Montgomery County Courthouse’s segregated restaurant. They kept up in touch as Reed went on to become president of Alabama State Teachers Association, an African-American teachers organization that merged with its all-white counterpart in 1969. So Steven L. Reed is well acquainted with Montgomery’s civil rights history.…
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‘God Is Not Going to Put It in Your Lap.’ What Made Fannie Lou Hamer’s Message on Civil Rights So Radical—And So Enduring

In recent years, amid increasing white supremacist violence and a disturbing run of mass shootings, “thoughts and prayers” have been offered again and again. They may well soothe hearts and minds. But activists have also pushed back against the idea that they provide any solution. That same idea was powerfully articulated more than half a century ago by Fannie Lou Hamer, a civil rights activist born on Oct. 6, 1917. “You can pray until you faint, but if you don’t get up and try to do something, God is not going to put it in your lap.” With characteristic aplomb, Hamer delivered these powerful words at a mass meeting in Indianola, Miss., in September 1964. Hamer’s bold message—that each of us has the responsibility to work toward the just and…
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The 1960’s – From Civil Rights to Black Power

  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gBPeCQzHu5w     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xbbcjn4d1cE  The March on Washington - Highpoint of the Civil Rights Movement Movements are like the ocean, with waves of high activity and periods of relative calm. The 1960's, like the 1920's before it, represented a wave of high activity in the African American political movement. Most think of the 60’s as the most turbulent period in American history. Some call it the unfinished Black Revolution. In many respects, it was like the Civil War, all over again. African Americans fought for their freedom during the Civil War. At the end of that fight, they got - Reconstruction. However, Post Reconstruction brought about Jim Crow, or American Apartheid – separate, but "equal". Jim Crow was ended by the Civil Rights Movement which reached its plateau in…
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Quiet Revolution in the South

Quiet Revolution in the South The Impact of the Voting Rights Act, 1965-1990 Quiet Revolution in the South: The Impact of the Voting Rights Act, 1965-1990 looks at the causes of increases in African American office-holding in the South in the two decades following the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. This research included the impact of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 on changes in local city election structure, the enfranchisement of Blacks in the South, and the prevention of the dilution of minority votes when it comes to enabling Blacks to win local office.  Authors Chandler Davidson and Bernard Grofman The two authors of Quiet Revolution in the South, Professor Chandler Davidson and Professor Bernard Grofman, are recognized experts in the field of Voting Rights. Dr. Grofman…
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VA’21 Tip-Republicans Master Power-Democrats Weak

What lessons should the Democrats learn from the loss of the Governor's race and state House of Delegates in the Virginia 2021 elections and the election night scare in New Jersey? As expected, numerous pundits, news reporters, Democratic and Republican Party operatives, and elected officials have blanketed cable news shows on MSNBC and CNN offering their analyses. Most of that analysis to date has centered on the movement of white so-called swing voters from the Democrats column back to the Republican column. Suburban Swing Voters & White Women. One such group that has been the focus of much pontification is white suburban women. Virginia returns and exit polls suggest that some independents and white women in the suburbs moved to Republicans. Many pundits have talked about swing voters and white…
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African American History – The Struggle Continues

Slave Rebellions to Barak Obama A History of African American Political Struggle [HDquiz quiz = "1595"] African American history is a history rich with political struggle. Whether we study the early slave rebellions, the Civil War, #reconstruction, Post-Reconstruction, the Garvey Movement, the 1960s Civil Rights and Black Power movements, or the rise of Black elected officials up to, and including, the election of Barak Obama, African Americans have engaged in deliberate political action to advance their quality of life within the United States. In 2008, tens of millions of African Americans turned out in historic numbers to propel Barak Obama to the Democratic Party nomination and, ultimately, the Presidency of the United States.  The turnout in that election was the culmination of a massive upswing in Black voting which began with the…
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Huge Black Voter Turnout Historical Threat to Whites

Black Voter Turnout Leads to White Backlash Since the end of slavery in the US, increases in Black Voter Turnout have led to a white backlash. Black voter turnout during the Reconstruction era of the 1870s lead to the emergence of large numbers of African American elected officials in the American South. This black political power was viewed as such a threat to white America, that it lead to organized white terror campaigns of murder, lynching, voter intimidation, voter suppression, and a new legal system of American Apartheid or Jim Crow. Black Voter Intimidation, Voter Suppression That Post- Reconstruction initiated backlash was the historical precedent for the voter intimidation and voter suppression being witnessed in the United States in the early 2020s.  It reversed all of the gains of the…
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The US Supreme Court Just Authorized More Voter Suppression

The United States Supreme Court (SCOTUS) dealt several blows to the Voting Rights Act last week. In a majority conservative 6-3 ruling, SCOTUS upheld two Arizona restrictions. The first prohibits individuals other than close family members or caregivers from collecting mail-in ballots. The second requires elections officials to reject votes from people who report to incorrect precincts even if they are registered voters in their states. One of the few dissenting voices, Justice Elena Kagan, stated: “What is tragic here is that the Court has yet again rewritten—in order to weaken—a statute that stands as a monument to America’s greatness, and protects against its basest impulses. What is tragic is that the court has damaged a statute designed to bring about ‘the end of discrimination in voting.’” This transcends Arizona. At a…
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50 years since the 26th amendment

Rock the Vote?Does anyone remember this? Or this? Okay. Videos and efforts to turn out youth voters have existed for as long as I can remember, going back to my middle school age—which is before that Madonna video above. The truth is, Democratic efforts are built on young people. We know and have known for quite some time that non-Baby Boomers see reality very differently. I always think of it this way: My parents grew up in a world where a high school diploma put them on a career track to full homeownership at pocket change in comparison to today’s dollars, a car, and kids, with no real debt. That just isn’t at all the same today. As generations get further away from the Baby Boomers, it gets harder. Despite all of…
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This Supreme Court session was bad, but wait until you see what they have on tap for the next one

The court will hear Carson v. Maine, which asks whether the Constitution requires that states spend public money on explicitly religious education. This is a First Amendment case that should be clear cut—that whole establishment clause business of prohibiting government from "unduly preferring religion over non-religion, or non-religion over religion." Plaintiffs are challenging Maine's ban on using state-provided financial aid—public funding from taxpayers—for students to attend religious schools. It's also going to take up American Hospital Association v. Becerra. This one is a challenge to federal regulations that reduced Medicare reimbursement rates to hospitals for certain prescription drugs. It's another run at the government's ability to make regulation and could weaken or overturn the Chevron deference, or Chevron doctrine. That's an administrative law principle dating back to 1984, and the Chevron…
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Mitch McConnell Says Voter Suppression Doesn’t Exist in Any US State

At this point in time, Republicans have realized that their platform is not very popular. There is a clear reason why they have stopped talking ideas and have gone all the way in on the culture war. No leader has ever tried to suppress the vote quite like Donald Trump did. He even had his Postmaster General, Louis DeJoy, sabotage the postal service to make it harder for people to vote by mail. And since Joe Biden’s victory in November, Red states have committed to making it even harder for people to vote. There have already been 22 news laws aimed at making it harder for people to exercise their franchise. But to hear Mitch McConnell tell it, voter suppression is a completely fabricated Democratic idea. The senate minority leader…
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Republicans In Georgia Are Targeting And Removing Black Election Officials

Georgia Republicans are using new voter suppression laws to target and remove black local election officials. The New York Times reported: Across Georgia, members of at least 10 county election boards have been removed, had their position eliminated, or are likely to be kicked off through local ordinances or new laws passed by the state legislature. At least five are people of color and most are Democrats — though some are Republicans — and they will most likely all be replaced by Republicans. The same targeting is happening in Arkansas and Kansas and could soon be coming to Arizona. There has rightly been a great deal of discussion about the Republican election-rigging laws impact the ability of people to vote, but an even more sinister element of these bills is…
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How Joe Manchin Survives as a Democrat in West Virginia

With the fate of the progressive agenda depending on the support of Senator Joe Manchin III, who said again on Sunday that he would not abandon the filibuster to pass an expansive voting rights bill, interest groups and activists are gearing up for a full push to try to sway the moderate Democrat. It would be enough to make almost any Democratic politician in the country squirm.But probably not a Democrat from West Virginia.None of the demographic groups that animate today’s Democratic coalition are well-represented in the state. Black, Hispanic, college-educated, young, urban and professional voters all represent a much smaller share of the electorate in West Virginia than just about anywhere else.White voters without a four-year degree, Donald Trump’s demographic base, made up 69 percent of voters there in…
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Kamala Harris and a High-Risk, High-Reward Presidential Résumé

Hi. Welcome to On Politics, your wrap-up of the week in national politics. I’m Lisa Lerer, your host.Is Kamala Harris drawing the shortest straws in the White House?This week, President Biden announced that Ms. Harris would lead the administration’s effort to protect voting rights, a task he immediately said would “take a hell of a lot of work.”And on Sunday, Ms. Harris leaves for her first trip abroad, visiting Mexico and Guatemala as part of her mandate to address the root causes of migration from Central America that are contributing to a surge of people trying to cross the United States’ Southern border.The central political question facing Ms. Harris has never been whether she will run for president again. It’s when and how.Yet for a history-making politician with big ambitions,…
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Africa: Gender Violence Claims Rock Pan-African Parliament

Johannesburg, Claims of gender-based violence have rocked the Pan-African Parliament after representatives tussled over the next president of the institution's bureau. The incident happened during a session on Monday as the legislators listened to a presentation by an ad-hoc committee formed to harmonise proposals on how to elect the next president. A clip aired by South African channel News24 showed representatives hassling one another, with South African legislator Pemmy Majodina, the ANC chief whip, claiming she had been hit by her Senegalese counterpart Djibril War. According to her, she was trying to stop an altercation between Mr War, a Senegalese politician, and a Zimbabwean legislator. "I went in there to make peace. As I was trying to separate them ... it was at this stage that I was hit by…
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After Skirting Filibuster Fight for Months, Democrats Near a First Battle

WASHINGTON — With a showdown coming over the creation of an independent commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol assault, Democrats are finally bumping up against the limits of what they can accomplish in the evenly divided Senate without changes to the filibuster rules.Republicans who see the commission as a threat to their midterm election hopes are poised to employ the procedural weapon to block the formation of the inquiry as early as Thursday, potentially dooming it while underscoring the power of a determined Senate minority to kill legislation even if it is popular and has bipartisan support.It is the sort of clash that lawmakers have been anticipating since the first day of this Congress, when it was clear that the 50-50 breakdown in the Senate would make it nearly…
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He Fought Trump’s 2020 Lies. He Also Backs New Scrutiny of Ballots.

Brad Raffensperger, the Republican secretary of state in Georgia, earned widespread praise for his staunch defense of the election results in his state last year in the face of growing threats and pressure from former President Donald J. Trump.As Mr. Trump spread falsehoods about the election, Mr. Raffensperger vocally debunked them, culminating in a 10-page letter addressed to Congress on Jan. 6, the day of the Capitol riot, in which he refuted, point by point, Mr. Trump’s false claims about election fraud in Georgia.But after a Georgia judge ruled late last week that a group of voters must be allowed to view copies of all 147,000 absentee ballots cast in the state’s largest county, in yet another disinformation-driven campaign, Mr. Raffensperger voiced his support for the effort, saying that inspecting…
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Republicans Move to Limit a Grass-Roots Tradition of Direct Democracy

In 2008, deep-blue California banned same-sex marriage. In 2018, steadfastly conservative Arkansas and Missouri increased their minimum wage. And last year, Republican-controlled Arizona and Montana legalized recreational marijuana.These moves were all the product of ballot initiatives, a century-old fixture of American democracy that allows voters to bypass their legislatures to enact new laws, often with results that defy the desires of the state’s elected representatives. While they have been a tool of both parties in the past, Democrats have been particularly successful in recent years at using ballot initiatives to advance their agenda in conservative states where they have few other avenues.But this year, Republican-led legislatures in Florida, Idaho, South Dakota and other states have passed laws limiting the use of the practice, one piece of a broader G.O.P. attempt…
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Arizona election ‘audit’ is going so well, Republican lawmaker says ‘It makes us look like idiots’

Republicans are trying to have 2.1 million ballots from Maricopa County—where the majority of the state’s voters live—“audited.” So far, the conspiracy theorists in charge of the effort have gotten through 250,000 ballots, which puts them on track to finish in August. They only have the space where they’re currently working reserved until May 14, at which point they will have to find someplace else to move the ballots and equipment, because there are high school graduation ceremonies scheduled at the Veterans Memorial Coliseum beginning on May 17. A former Arizona secretary of state involved in the effort claims they will finish in June or July, depending which news outlet he’s talking to, after hiring more workers—currently less than half of the tables available for counting are staffed. The hiring process has already led…
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House Republicans moving to replace Cheney after she again calls out seditionists for their lies

It is impossible to feel sympathy for Cheney, whose odious version of conservatism was never far afield of the lie-fueled, panic-promoting opportunism that has now reduced the movement to conspiracy theory and demands to tamp down on democracy itself, but the Republican move is a dire one for the country. Supporting fraudulent claims that the last United States election was "stolen" and therefore invalid due to invisible "fraud" that not even Trump's gaudiest of allies has been able to identify is now an absolute requirement for maintaining a Republican leadership position. Even after violent attempted insurrection and the attempted assassination of Trump’s declared enemies, the hoax is now not just an unofficial Republican Party policy but a mandated position. It is all based on a lie, and a lie Trump publicly insisted…
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G.O.P. Seeks to Empower Poll Watchers, Raising Intimidation Worries

HOUSTON — The red dot of a laser pointer circled downtown Houston on a map during a virtual training of poll watchers by the Harris County Republican Party. It highlighted densely populated, largely Black, Latino and Asian neighborhoods.“This is where the fraud is occurring,” a county Republican official said falsely in a leaked video of the training, which was held in March. A precinct chair in the northeastern, largely white suburbs of Houston, he said he was trying to recruit people from his area “to have the confidence and courage” to act as poll watchers in the circled areas in upcoming elections.A question at the bottom corner of the slide indicated just how many poll watchers the party wanted to mobilize: “Can we build a 10K Election Integrity Brigade?”As Republican…
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Political fights complicate calculus for companies in business-friendly Georgia.

“You don’t feed a dog that bites your hand,” said Ralston, R-Blue Ridge.With the eyes of the nation focused squarely on Georgia as a political swing state, the quarrel may be a sign of what’s to come. Republicans are trying to energize their base after Georgia narrowly backed Democrats for president and the U.S. Senate. Meanwhile, many companies that have cultivated a more progressive image are being pushed to respond by employees, some investors and social media users.“You can’t be a bystander in this day and age,” Sundar Bharadwaj, a professor at the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business. “The decision making is about where, when and how to play, rather than whether to play.”The political fireworks could complicate Georgia’s efforts to attract more corporations, such as the Georgia…
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